Waze and Routing around traffic

When I first started using Waze, it seemed to be very good at saying “hey, there’s a traffic jam ahead, try this other route.” Over the past few months, though, it’s felt like that’s no longer the case. Traffic needs to have built up for a while before Waze will consider other options. No matter how many reports of heavy traffic there are, if it’s hasn’t been there for a while, you’re going to be headed right through it. I guess I just wish it was quicker to reroute.

Collected Links for July 10

Hawkeye Supercut | The Comics Journal

A nice review of some of what makes Matt Fraction’s run on Hawkeye so good. Very spoiler heavy, so if you haven’t read it yet…

Why the Great Glitch of July 8th Should Scare You — The Message — Medium

The big problem we face isn’t coordinated cyber-terrorism, it’s that software sucks. Software sucks for many reasons, all of which go deep, are entangled, and expensive to fix. (Or, everything is broken, eventually).

Joe Walsh – Life’s Been Good (Live Spoken Word Version) – YouTube

Joe Walsh tells some of the tales behind one of my favorite of his songs.

Open Tabs for September 25, 2014

How to tell when a robot has written you a letter — The Message — Medium

I’ve always found this kind of thing interesting. I get things like this in the mail from time to time. I knew it wasn’t a printer that did it, but I figured an autopen was too much for a car dealership to have. 


Anthony Bourdain Has Become The Future Of Cable News, And He Couldn’t Care Less

I love Anthony Bourdain. We saw him up in Lowell a number of years ago. Great evening, even with the lady who took the Q&A session as an opportunity to try and pitch him a dessert hummus. 

(Via kottke)

 

Josh Donaldson Turns Bad Play Into Cool-As-Hell Play

Heads-up play. 

Oh, Facebook

Ohhh, Facebook. You keep giving me reasons to think about giving you up.

This week, it’s this article from Ad Age

the social network will not be honoring the do-not-track setting on web browsers. A Facebook spokesman said that’s “because currently there is no industry consensus.”

So, let me get this straight… people set a switch on their browser that says “do not track me” and Facebook decides that because there’s no agreement as to what that means, they can ignore it? Maybe a better approach would have been to say that all these people have intentionally set this flag, and even though we can’t all agree on what this means, we’ll honor what the users intentions are. But that’s not Facebook’s way. Time and again, they have proven that they’re not interested in what the users want (and take action to prevent Facebook from doing), they’re going to do whatever suits Facebook best and screw the users. 

it looks like IE10 and Firefox are set to “do not track” by default, which could be used to counter my above argument that people are setting it. Facebook could be the bigger entity here and go along with it, or they could just ignore it for those two browsers. 

The best part, though, when I search Google for “Facebook do not track,” the fourth hit is a note from Facebook from almost 3 years ago. From that article:

If you want to be anonymous online, three of the four major Internet browsers now let you send a “Do Not Track” signal. We respect that signal and won’t track your surfing, but too many companies don’t respect “Do Not Track,” including the largest online — Google. 

Google’s Chrome is the only major browser not to include an adequate “Do Not Track” setting and Google’s web sites don’t respect your “Do Not Track” signals.

Google’s doing the same thing, but at least they didn’t flip-flop on the issue to whatever’s most convenient for them. 

Guess it’s time for another privacy lockdown on Facebook. 

Manilla Closing – or Let Me Pay For Your Service

[Manilla is closing down as of July 1](https://www.manilla.com/announcement/). It was a good service, but I’m not entirely surprised. I tried it for a while before switching to [FileThis](https://filethis.com/). I think FileThis is better for two reasons.

One is because it let me automagically download everything to Dropbox. While Dropbox could (theoretically) go away at any time, I’ll still have the local copies of my data.

The other thing FileThis has going for it is it’s not free. Ultimately, servers and bandwidth and employees cost money. I feel much safer relying on a service I can pay for, knowing I’m supporting my usage. IFTTT, I’m looking at you.